• Prescribing Information
  • Medical Information
  • Tru Patient Stories

    Meet Rayna, Katelyn, and Lauren, real patients who would like to share their stories – and how their experience taught them the importance of getting vaccinated against MenB.​​​​​​​​​​​​​​

    Rayna

    Katelyn

    Lauren

    Typical adolescent and young adult sharing behaviors increase the risk of MenB.2-5

    Your adolescent and young adult patients share many things. Unfortunately, their typical behaviors, like group activities, sharing cups, drinks, utensils, close-quartered living and kissing, increase MenB risk.2-5​​​​​
    ​​​​​​


    The impact of MenB

    MenB is uncommon, but potentially fatal, and early symptoms may seem like the flu.2,6

    Early symptoms—such as nausea and vomiting—of MenB may be misinterpreted as the flu, delaying adolescents and young adults from seeking immediate medical attention and making diagnosis challenging. In fact, the average time before adolescents and young adults are taken to a hospital is 12 to 19 hours.7-9

    In 24 hours MenB can kill.7

    ~10% of MenB cases lead to death, even with
    appropriate antibiotic therapy.10

    ~20% of those who survive MenB will have permanent or long-term sequelae such as7,11:​​​​​​
    ​​​​​​​

    •    Motor impairment
    ​​​​​​​

    •    Skin scarring
    ​​​​​​​

    •    Limb amputations
    ​​​​​​​

    •    Neurological dysfunction
    ​​​​​​​

    •    Hearing impairment
    ​​​​​​​

    From 2011 to 2019, MenB has been responsible for all US college outbreaks of meningococcal disease.12

    MenB remains unpredictable; ~98% of all meningococcal disease cases are sporadic.13

    Why adolescents and young adults?

    Among 10 through 25 year olds, the incidence of MenB peaks around 19 years of age.14

    While uncommon, MenB accounts for approximately 62% of all meningococcal disease cases in persons 16 to 23 years of age in the United States.15,16*​​​​​​

    *Approximately 50 to 60 cases of MenB are reported annually in adolescents and young adults in the US.16

    Contact your Pfizer Sales Representative or call a Vaccine Specialist at 
    ​​​​​​​1-844-439-2571.


    References:
    1. Trumenba [prescribing information]. Philadelphia, PA: Pfizer Inc; 2019.
    2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Meningococcal disease. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. http://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/index.html. Updated January 21, 2020. Accessed July 6, 2020.
    3. Tully J, Viner RM, Coen PG, et al. Risk and protective factors for meningococcal disease in adolescents: matched cohort study. BMJ. 2006;332(7539):445-450.
    4. ​​​​​​​Dwilow R, Fanella S. Invasive meningococcal disease in the 21st century—an update for the clinician. Curr Neurol Neurosci Rep. 2015;15(2):1-9.
    5. ​​​​​​​Ewald AJ, McKeag DB. Meningitis in the athlete. Curr Sports Med Rep. 2008;7(1):22-27.
    6. ​​​​​​​Soeters HM, McNamara LA, Whaley M, et al. Serogroup B meningococcal disease outbreak and carriage evaluation at a college—Rhode Island, 2015. MMWR. 2015;64(22):606-607.
    7. Thompson MJ, Ninis N, Perera R, et al. Clinical recognition of meningococcal disease in children and adolescents. Lancet. 2006;367(9508):397-403.
    8. ​​​​​​​van Deuren M, Brandtzaeg P, van der Meer JWM. Update on meningococcal disease with emphasis on pathogenesis and clinical management. Clin Microbiol Rev. 2000;13(1):144-166.
    9. Brandtzaeg P. Chapter 21: Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of invasive meningococcal disease. In: Frosch M, Maiden MCJ, eds. Handbook of Meningococcal Disease: Infection Biology, Vaccination, Clinical Management. Weinheim, Germany; Wiley-VCH; 2006:427-480.
    10. ​​​​​​​Cohn AC, MacNeil JR, Harrison LH, et al. Changes in Neisseria meningitidis disease epidemiology in the United States, 1998-2007: implications for prevention of meningococcal disease. Clin Infect Dis. 2010;50(2):184-191.
    11. ​​​​​​​Bettinger JA, Scheifele DW, Le Saux N, et al. The disease burden of invasive meningococcal serogroup B disease in Canada. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2013;32(1):e20-e25.
    12. ​​​​​​​Marshall GS, Dempsey AF, Srivastava A, Isturiz RE. US college students are at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease. J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc. 2020;9(2):244-247. doi:10.1093/jpids/piz024.
    13. Folaranmi T, Rubin L, Martin SW, et al. Use of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines in persons aged ≥10 years at increased risk for serogroup B meningococcal disease: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015. MMWR. 2015;64(22):608-612.
    14. ​​​​​​​MacNeil N. Epidemiology and prevention of meningococcal disease in adolescents. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. National Center for Immunization & Respiratory Diseases. Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Disease Branch. http://health.mo.gov/living/wellness/immunizations/pdf/meningoccalvaccines71615.pdf. July 16, 2015. Accessed July 7, 2020.
    15. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Enhanced meningococcal disease surveillance report, 2018. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. https://www.cdc.gov/meningococcal/downloads/NCIRD-EMS-Report-2018.pdf. Accessed July 22, 2020.
    16. MacNeil JR, Rubin L, Folaranmi T, et al. Use of serogroup B meningococcal vaccines in adolescents and young adults: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, 2015. MMWR. 2015;64(41):1171-1176.

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    Coadministration with TRUMENBA

    TRUMENBA is the only MenB vaccine that demonstrated cross-coverage of diverse MenB strains.1

    See the data

    The science behind TRUMENBA

    Only TRUMENBA targets both subfamilies, A and B, of fHBP.1

    See the science

    Indication

    • Trumenba is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. Trumenba is approved for use in individuals 10 through 25 years of age
    • The effectiveness of the two-dose schedule of Trumenba against diverse N meningitidis serogroup B strains has not been confirmed
    • Severe allergic reaction after a previous dose of Trumenba is a contraindication
    • Some individuals with altered immunocompetence may have reduced immune responses to Trumenba
    • Persons with certain complement deficiencies and persons receiving treatment that inhibits terminal complement activation (for example, eculizumab) are at increased risk for invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B even if they develop antibodies following vaccination with Trumenba
    • As with any vaccine, vaccination with Trumenba may not protect all vaccine recipients against N meningitidis serogroup B infections
    • Syncope (fainting) can occur in association with administration of injectable vaccines, including Trumenba. Procedures should be in place to avoid injury from fainting
    • In clinical studies, the most common solicited adverse reactions in adolescents and young adults were pain at injection site (≥85%), fatigue (≥60%), headache (≥55%), and muscle pain (≥35%). Nausea was reported in up to 24% of adolescents in early phase studies
    • Sufficient data are not available on the safety and effectiveness of using Trumenba and other meningococcal group B vaccines interchangeably to complete the vaccination series
    • Safety and effectiveness have not been established in pregnant women
    • Trumenba is a vaccine indicated for active immunization to prevent invasive disease caused by Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. Trumenba is approved for use in individuals 10 through 25 years of age
    • The effectiveness of the two-dose schedule of Trumenba against diverse N meningitidis serogroup B strains has not been confirmed

    Please see full Prescribing Information.​​​​​​​